John Cleese Despises Christianity Antitheist

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John Cleese Despises Christianity Antitheist

“http://Lybio.net
The Accurate Source To Find Transcript To John Cleese Despises Christianity Antitheist.”

[John Cleese Despises Christianity Antitheist]

[Host:] Source: LYBIO.net
Malcolm, sorry to interrupt, but is it possible for John perhaps to answer one or two of those points…

[John Marwood Cleese (27 October 1939):]
Certainly. Certainly. Certainly.

[Host:]
otherwise we’ll have nine points unanswered?

[John Marwood Cleese:]
Yes, it’s building up the list of it.

[John Marwood Cleese:] Source: LYBIO.net
Yes, I mean… But seriously, the problem we have got is that you think that we’re ridiculing Jesus and we say, um, sort of sincerely and truthfully, that that is certainly not what we intended to do and I believe that we’re not, and I can best answer that, I think, by answering Muggeridge’s question, which is that, um, “What were we trying to do?” And I think it comes out, spelled out perhaps rather too plainly, rather too banally at one point, when he says, “Make up your own mind, don’t let other people tell you,” and we would absolutely deny, at least I would, that there was any attempt to say, “You should not believe in Christ. “What we’re saying is, take a critical view. Find out about it, don’t just believe because somebody tells you to, someone in a pulpit says something, question it, work it out…

[Thomas Malcolm Muggeridge (24 March 1903 – 14 November 1990):]
You’re seriously suggesting that, if someone saw that film, say a young kid…

[John Marwood Cleese):]
Mm-hm.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
…who knew nothing about the Gospels or about history…

[John Marwood Cleese:]
Mm-hm.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
…that the figure of Christ that would emerge from it, this story of the Incarnation, would be a noble one, um, would be…?

[John Marwood Cleese:]
He would have to sort it out –

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
Yes…

[John Marwood Cleese:]
for himself.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
And you feel…? You feel…

[John Marwood Cleese:]
He would have to for example work out – I mean, does one accept every word in the Bible? The Sermon on the Mount? Did they get it all right when Mark wrote it down 30 years later? I mean, was…? LAUGHTER

[Host:]
But is the film likely to be seen by anybody who doesn’t know an awful lot about Jesus Christ?

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
Most certain it is today. If you have it for children of 14 today, you will find that the many, many children of 14 today, thanks to the secular nature of the education they’re receiving, know nothing about it at all and they would see this figure…

[Host:]
I think…

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
…in the light in which he appears in this film, you see. It’s no good cheating yourselves, you can’t have it both ways. You produce this particular film, which arouses bursts of laughter, as I said earlier, rather easily procured, but don’t imagine that someone seeing that is going to go away with a concept of the founder of the Christian religion, and all that that meant to mankind, in any way corresponding to what history or the Gospels or anything Cleese’s has presented.

[John Cleese:]
It’s not supposed to be about him, so people shouldn’t see it to learn about him.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:] Source: LYBIO.net
It’s no good saying that…

[John Cleese:]
I’m not being dishonest!

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
You’re being utterly dishonest.

[John Cleese:]
Can I just say?

[Man:] Source: LYBIO.net
Yeah, I mean, I don’t know where this will get us, but I feel my approach to the film, I was confused, I feel I’m still asking questions, seeking solutions, I am very confused and perturbed by a religion, an established religion in this country, where people can go into church on a Sunday morning, and the same people can sing hymns and say prayers, and, at the same time, these people can stand by while their money is spent making bombs, making guns, building up appalling weapons of destruction, can sit by, sing hymns, say their prayers, and agree with a policy in which hospitals have to go without money.

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (27 May 1913 – 13 January 1995) (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):] Source: LYBIO.net
I’d like to know where you get your evidence. You’ve just given chapter and verse. It so happens, immediately before coming here, I was asked by a crowd of church people if I would stand up for the – sorry, for the – for the health – of St Olive’s Hospital, which the Government is trying to close. The Church is extremely active in these, er, in these fields and I would urge you not to make these careless generalizations which are not dependent on evidence.

[Man:]
Now I make them in all humility, I’m seeking answers and solutions, I’m not saying this is absolutely the way it is, but I have observed.

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
Well, what you were saying if I may say so, was sheer rubbish!

[Some gasps from the audience…]

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
You made a ridiculous generalization, which is unworthy of an educated man. Now, having said this, back to what you say, somebody aged 14 coming and seeing this thing of Jesus, what you are seeing is not one of the greatest teachers in the world, I mean, granted, lots of people, the majority of people wouldn’t accept him as the son of God, as I do, but surely most of us would see him as one of the greatest teachers of the world. Now, you wouldn’t guy Socrates or make him appear as a clown. And what I think this film…

[John Cleese:]
Maybe there are funny things about him.

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
What?

[John Cleese:]
Maybe there are funny things about Socrates, why shouldn’t we make jokes about Socrates?

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
Well, the aspects… [LAUGHTER] You would not Socrates.

[John Cleese:] Source: LYBIO.net
No, no.

[APPLAUSE]

[John Cleese:]
That’s not my point, I don’t know enough about Socrates…

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
Socrates also was murdered. He was made to drink poison. You wouldn’t guy him at that point or make him appear as a clown. What I say, and I’m afraid you won’t alter my conviction, John, over this, is that, suppose what is to a Christian the most sacred moment of the whole Jesus experience, namely his death, that is the most sacred moment, that he was guyed and made to look as a clown.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
May I make another point just here, which is rather interesting? That if you had made that film about…

LAUGHTER

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
..if you made that film about Muhammad, you see, there would’ve been an absolute hullabaloo in this country, because all the sort of, um, you know, the racial, anti-racialist people would’ve risen up in their might, the same people who would approve of this, and would’ve said this is quite disgraceful and behind people’s minds would be the thought maybe they might lose a bit of oil, you know, by doing it. But you see the difference…

[John Cleese:]
You’re right! 400 years ago, we would have been burnt for this film. Now, I’m suggesting that we’ve made an advance.

LAUGHTER.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:] Source: LYBIO.net
And I’m suggesting…

APPLAUSE

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
And I’m … I’m suggesting that, compared with other presentations of this great event, the Incarnation, you have not made an advance and that anybody in the future who might dredge up this miserable little film, and it’s quite possible they might as a piece of social history, they would certainly not wish to relate it to the say, Chartres Cathedral, which is built…

SOME LAUGHTER

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
…to the glory of Christ.

[John Cleese:]
Not a funny building actually. LAUGHTER

[Malcolm Muggeridge:] Source: LYBIO.net
But they might want to compare it with Fawlty Towers!

[John Cleese:]
Yes, not even intended to be a funny building.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
Well, it has the gargoyles on it, you know.

[Man:]
Michael?

[Man:]
I think that, and I’ve seen this in the reviews of the film, they concentrate always on the religious angle. Even you know, before they’ve seen it, they’ve decided it’s a film about religion. I don’t think it is entirely. I think what we’ve chosen to do is what we’ve always done in Python, we’ve done for three series and over three films. We have taken a certain group of people, generally sort of England in the present day, and put them in a historical context and I think that’s what we did with this. It isn’t entirely about religion; it’s about the people who live in, anyone who lives and makes up our society today.

[John Cleese:]
It’s also about closed systems of thought, whether political, theological, religious or whatever. Systems by which whatever evidence is given to the person, he merely adapts it, fits it into his ideology. You show the same event to a Marxist and a Catholic, for example, they both of them fine, they both have explanations of it when it’s to be pompous Poppers on about falsifiability of theories. I mean, once you’ve actually got an idea that is whirring round so fast that no other light or contrary evidence can come in, then I think it’s very dangerous. So I think not dangerous to someone like Malcolm, because he is very nice, but he is the sort of guy that this film is actually having a go at, because I don’t think any evidence will come now that is going to make him rethink, “Am I right? Am I making a mistake?”

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
Well, um, you can leave that out. I think I can say with utter sincerity that there is nothing in this particular film that would lead me to want to change conclusions that I’ve reached after living for 76 years in this world.

[John Cleese:] Source: LYBIO.net
Is there anything? That’s the point I’m making.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
Well, in this film, there is nothing that could possibly, because the film itself bore so little to…

[John Cleese:]
The point I was making was not the film –

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
Yes.

[John Cleese:]
forget the film, you’d said it’s rubbish, okay. Is there anything that can happen to you change your mind?

[Malcolm Muggeridge:] Source: LYBIO.net
Oh, certainly! But of course, every single person who is alive, and spiritually alive, is constantly reviewing his faith. I do not believe for a moment that there is a definitive faith and you say, “There it is.” But there’s nothing in this little squalid number that could possibly affect anybody and, in that sense, I give you this point – I give you this point.

[John Cleese:]
Might it not…?

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
There’s nothing in this film that could possibly destroy anybody’s genuine faith that I grant you absolutely not because it’s much too tenth rate for that.

LAUGHTER

[John Cleese:]
But the, the…

SOME APPLAUSE

[John Cleese:]
But, um…

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
But what I still contend is that someone who is young, 14 years old, seeing that without any particular background might really imagine that that buffoonery is an expression…

[John Cleese:]
Yes.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
…of this great episode.

[John Cleese:]
Well, you see, I was also – you talked about the presentation of Christianity. I went to an English preparatory school, an English public school, Clifton College, the sports academy.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
I sympathize with you.

LAUGHTER

[John Cleese:]
I was given eight or ten years, ten years of a form of Christianity which I grew to despise and dislike. Largely, it insulted my intelligence. The sermons that were given at the age of 11 and 12, I felt insulted my intelligence. When I got into writing this film, we all had exactly the same reaction. We started to discover a lot of stuff about Christianity and I started to get angry, because I started to think, “Why was I given this rubbish, this tenth-rate series of platitudes, “when there were interesting things to have discussed? “There were factual things.”

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
You feel…?

[John Cleese:]
Nobody told me they don’t know what language the Gospels were written in and they don’t even know who wrote them and they’re not sure what cities they were written in!

[Malcolm Muggeridge:] LYBIO.net
And then you must have read very superficially at your school.

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):] Source: L Y B I O . N E T
It’s bad luck of you, but I used to go to Clifton College to preach very often when you were there.

John Cleese Despises Christianity Antitheist Part 2

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[John Cleese Despises Christianity Antitheist Part 2]

[John Cleese:]
They don’t even know who wrote them and they’re not sure what cities they were written in!

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
And then you must have read very superficially at your school.

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
Look John, it’s very bad luck of you, but you see I used to go to Clifton College to preach very often when you were there.

LAUGHTER AND APPLAUSE

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
I know, I know the headmaster, I know the staff. I this stuff. All I can say is, you must’ve been as idle a boy as, as splendid an actor as you are, because…

[John Cleese:]
I wasn’t, I was always open.

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
…you really, to take this seriously! I mean, you had some absolutely first-class teachers.

[John Cleese:]
Those services were a joke! They were a joke!

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
Well and only cause you made it so. You cannot…

[John Cleese:]
No! I was…

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
How do you know about? I know people from Clifton College exactly your own period…

[John Cleese:]
I remember the sermons!

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
…who are now priests in my own diocese.

[John Cleese:]
I remember the sermons, I remember…

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
You don’t remember my, tell me what I preached on?

[John Cleese:]
No idea! I only remember the bad ones.

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
[Laughs]

[John Cleese:]
I remember a gentleman coming and telling us how very difficult it had proved to get the Bible into Tibet. They’d had seven occasions. The first time, there were landslides. The second time, there were rains and the pages got stuck together. The third time, this is true! The third time, the mules had fallen off the mountain side. The fourth time, there were thunderbolts. And the seventh time, he said, God helped us and we got the Bibles into Tibet. The obvious conclusion was that he was trying like hell to stop them getting the Bible.

APPLAUSE

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
John, I’m sorry, but you really are lampooning this, because about O-levels and A-levels going on the whole time, people have taken the scriptures, they have had to study Greek, perhaps Hebrew and have had to make a serious study of the scriptures. You chose not to do that.

[John Cleese:]
We made a superficial study…

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
I’m sure you’d better things to do!

[John Cleese:] Source: LYBIO.net
We only had four years to write the film. We didn’t want to get too specialist, because if we got too specialist…

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
I’m sorry, I’m talking about Clifton College but sir I don’t think there’s going to be much…

[Host:]
Can I just ask as I think, in theory, anyway sort of moderator, I’m supposed to be neutral.

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
Church of Scotland or Church of England?

AUDIENCE LAUGHS

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
Moderator in the church.

[Host:]
I’m supposed to be in the middle. But did um… – I mean, I felt when I saw the film, and I saw it in a cinema in New York with a very appreciative audience, did you not feel that in fact the people being lampooned were in fact the followers rather than Jesus himself? I felt that very strongly.

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
No, no, no. I don’t think so. It was… I really felt… I mean, at the crucifixion above all else, which I think I felt sad about because – I mean, I’m quite sure, as all of us will one day and this is not trying to attack your vulnerabilities, but life is very short. All of us go on our deathbeds in a comparatively short time and when I – when we are, and that will be no laughing matter, it is very much that Christ which I would like to be held up in front of me than the Christ I saw this afternoon.

[Host:]
that the film reminded me – it did bring home to me…

[John Cleese:]
That’s just…

[Host:]
Sorry.

[Host:]
I was going to say very quickly that the film reminded me of something which I obviously already knew but one tends to forget, that it wasn’t only Jesus that was crucified. An awful lot of people were crucified in horrific circumstances every day of the week under Roman rule.

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
Yes… yes, that’s very true.

[Host:]
And that fact came home in the film. You realize that Jesus didn’t have a sort of total copyright on crucifixion?

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
Yeah, but Jesus was crucified, wasn’t he, for his obedience to the will of God. You can’t say…

[John Cleese:]
He was crucified surely for blasphemy?

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
Well, they accused him of blasphemy because he was obedient to the word of God and of his kingdom. You can’t say there came over today with any of the people being crucified.

[Host:]
But that wasn’t…

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
The whole way that it was done, they were not dying for a noble idea.

[John Cleese:] Source: LYBIO.net
Well, neither were the…

[Man:]
But I mean that what – can I just make the point I was trying to make earlier on about the film not being seen entirely in religious terms? That I mean as Tim has said, people were crucified then as common criminals. It was just a form then of capital punishment employed by the Romans who were regarded as highly civilized people, but it was capital punishment and in the film, we examine attitudes to capital punishment. As far as I know in this country, the majority of people have constantly told are in favor of capital punishment. It just seems we haven’t come that far in all that time.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
Why do you think, in all these centuries of Christendom, that the greatest minds, the most creative minds, the greatest artists were believers in this thing that you airily dismiss and say that you, making this little film, have managed to see deeply into it?

[Multiple Speakers]

I don’t…

I wish I knew..

How say to you… What about Freddie … What about Bertrand Russell?

You dismiss them, of course. You don’t care.

AUDIENCE LAUGHS

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
I said the centuries of Christendom. I didn’t say in our time. I said if you were to make a list of all the people who have contributed most…

[John Cleese:]
Most of them would have been Muslims – if they’d been living in Arab countries, or Buddhists who have been living in …

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
What’s that got to do with it?

LAUGHTER

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
These people were inspired – these people were inspired by this event, which you have celebrated in this film by a lot of people on crosses, singing a sort of – as if it was rather an inferior musical.

[John Cleese:]
Death… death… death perhaps doesn’t matter that much which is what you’re saying the whole time. You’re looking forward to it?

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
I’m looking forward to it keenly, but I’m looking forward to it…

[John Cleese:]
So you’re not sad about it?

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
No, I’m looking forward to it keenly because I know because I relate it to these very things that you dismiss. I relate it to the story of the incarnation, this great drama of the incarnation, which you have reduced to a sort of comic film. Now, you think that in doing that you have shed light. I have to tell you that you haven’t shed light. You’ve made some rather bad jokes and the only reason that people come to see it is because they still relate it to this extraordinary story of the incarnation, which is, in fact, the beginning and the end of everything that our civilization stands for. Our civilization began with a man, the apostle Paul, telling the pagan world about the incarnation. That was the beginning of it.

[John Cleese:] Source: LYBIO.net
We’re not the only civilization in the world.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
No, I am not saying we are.

[John Cleese:]
There’s a lot of civilizations with different religions, right?

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
Certainly, certainly… I’m not …

[John Cleese:]
The important thing is people should be open to various possibilities.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
But…who ever…

[John Cleese:]
And they should take a critical attitude.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
Yes, but who ever said they shouldn’t be open? You don’t make people open by producing the sort of buffoonery you produced.

[John Cleese:]
We certainly don’t make people open by giving them the kind of garbage I was given at that school.

LAUGHTER AND APPLAUSE

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
I’m very sympathetic to you for having received this garbage, some of it at the hands of our friend the bishop here. I’m very sympathetic indeed and I think it’s very sad and tragic you should have been cut off from something that’s so wonderful and only given garbage. But I would simply point out to you that if you look, if you – if you care about what constitutes what we call western civilization, which is now probably is coming to an end, and you were to consider the role that’s been played in that by this thing that you treat as a piece of buffoonery, you would – you would have a certain humility in saying that you have been able, through making it, to shed light upon something.

[John Cleese:]
You keep making the assumption… Sorry, let me just say this. You keep making the basic assumption that we are ridiculing Christ and Christ’s teaching and I say that we are not.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
Do you imagine your scene, for instance the Sermon on the Mount, the scene in your film of the Sermon on the Mount, is not ridiculing one of the most sublime utterances that any human being has ever spoken on this earth? Of course it is.

[John Cleese:]
No, no it makes fun of the guy who’s remembered it wrong and the people who don’t understand it and missed the point.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
Well, I think…

[Man:] Source: LYBIO.net
I think that’s really unfair because a lot of people looking in will think we have actually ridiculed Christ physically. Christ is played by an actor, Kenneth Colley. He speaks the words from the Sermon on the Mount. It’s treated respectfully. The camera pans away, we go to the back of the crowd and someone shouts, “Speak up!” Because they can’t hear.

LAUGHTER

[Man:]
Now, if that utterly undermines your faith in Christ, then it can’t be that strong.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
No…no…no… Of course it doesn’t. I started off saying this is such a tenth-rate film that I don’t believe it would disturb anybody’s faith…

[Man:]
Yes, I know… you started with an open mind, I realize that.

LAUGHTER AND APPLAUSE

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
John, may I put to you a question?

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
Now, without in any way being pompous, I have been Bishop of South London now for over 20 years and I’m appalled by the sadness, the unhappiness, the tragedy of life and the drug scene, the violence, the muggings and so on. And many people now are standing back with a measure of deep disturbance and some horror. I was at the University of Cambridge only the Sunday before last and I’m told how the undergraduates are now turning up to chapel and seeking, seeing if Christianity has got something to offer. There, I think most of us, I’m sure all of you, however much you may differ on this film, that we are deeply disturbed by what’s going on in the world and in this country. Now, we are – there is a desire to find truth. To find some answer to our problems and the question I mean I would put to you is I mean could you really put your hand on your heart and say that film is going to help the younger generation…

[John Cleese:]
Absolutely…

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
In its pilgrimage for truth?

[John Cleese:]
Absolutely –

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
Well, John…

[John Cleese:]
the message is…what is it, Michael? Work it out for yourselves, you’re all individuals. Don’t do what people tell you to do. And that’s not…

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
You find that a finalness of…?

[John Cleese:]
No, no, starting point…

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
Starting point, it’s not a starting point…

John Cleese Despises Christianity Antitheist Arthur Mervyn Stockwood

John Cleese Despises Christianity Antitheist Arthur Mervyn Stockwood

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
Including the lampooning of Christ?

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
And the lampooning of his death, which is the most disgraceful part?

[Multiple Speakers]

[Man:]
I think that’s where we disagree on that part… I can’t…

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
Surely, Michael, it was a lampooning of a form of death which happened to hundreds of people?

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
You are lampooning a scene which has been played in fantastic part in the lives of believers for generations. A scene that has inspired the most amazing – amazing disinterestedness, creativity, that set St Francis of Assisi wandering about the streets.

[Man:]
It’s true.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
That inspired St Augustine to write The City Of God…

[Man:]
This I accept, but I think the crucifixion…

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
All you’ve done is to make a lot of people on the cross, singing a music hall song.

LAUGHTER

[Man:]
Lots of people… could I – –

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
I mean, it’s so disgusting when you think of it.

[Man:]
A lot of people go away very happy, laughing, at that, their faith not touched one jot.

[Multiple Speakers]

[Malcolm Muggeridge:] Source: LYBIO.net
I don’t … I don’t think it would touch their faith.

APPLAUSE

[Arthur Mervyn Stockwood (Anglican Bishop of Southwark):]
I said it [ ] at this point… A lot of people on the first Good Friday went away from Calgary, laughing their heads off and thinking the death of Jesus was a tremendous joke.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
But that’s very true you know…

APPLAUSE

John Cleese Despises Christianity Antitheist Malcolm Muggeridge

John Cleese Despises Christianity Antitheist Malcolm Muggeridge

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
As a matter of fact, all you’ve done – the person you’ve followed in this film is Herod because it was Herod who organized this absurd scene and I’m only amazed that you didn’t get some comic effects out of the crown of thorns. That’s the only thing that puzzles me in the film.

[Man:]
If we wanted to make a joke of Jesus, Jesus he would’ve been on the cross.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
It was acting.

[Man:]
There in the film, he does not appear.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
You make…

[Man:]
It’s a gang of thieves, of common criminals who were, at that time, crucified in the hundreds day by day. I mean that’s – I’m sorry. I know, well, you think I’m wrong, but that’s what I feel. It is not Christ…

[Multiple Speakers]

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
I think it’s ludicrous because the people seeing this…

[John Cleese:]
This is what the film’s about.

[Host:]
Malcolm can I just say… to an outsider, the Crucifixion is a much stronger event if one realizes that Christ went through something that everyone went through. But if you treat it like something only he went through, which is the image you get, I never realized everyone got crucified.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
But of course you’ve seen it, but I mean – if he was crucified between…

[Host:]
I also have to say we have to…

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
He was crucified between two thieves. If you are saying that the experience of those three people was the same, it’s been simply because they went through the same physical experience, then you are utterly misunderstanding what the Crucifixion means, what the Passion means. Why it’s had this enormous role in people’s lives. It wouldn’t have had that role if it was simply one of innumerable men dying on a cross. It’s because of what it signified, that – that – that – in terms of the incarnation, and, of course, you leave that all out of account. What you’ve done is you’ve made… You’ve succeeded in doing, and for that reason, it will have absolutely no influence in the long run. You have succeeded in reducing something which has inspired the greatest art into something which is presented in terms of the lowest art. That’s your feat.

[Multiple Speakers]

[Man:]
In your own terms that we have to influence people, we’re not saying anyone to influence, but we’re trying to make them laugh, make them happy.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
Yeah…

[Man:]
I mean it’s – that’s something that helps them in the current situation the world is in.

[Host:]
Gentlemen, I’ll have to call a halt. I am very sorry. I think you’ve made people happy and made them think and laugh. And…

[John Cleese:]
I think we’ve made them talk about it.

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
You’ll get your 30 pieces of silver, I’m quite sure.

[Host:]
I hasten to add but…

APPLAUSE

[Cross Talk Inaudible]

[Malcolm Muggeridge:]
You’re missing a wonderful thing by seeing it in those terms and it’s utterly tragic to me.

[Host:] Source: LYBIO.net
Gentlemen, thank you very much. I hope that film won’t shake anybody’s faith.

John Cleese Despises Christianity Antitheist

John Cleese Despises Christianity Antitheist

John Cleese Despises Christianity Antitheist. The important thing is people should be open to various possibilities.Complete Full Transcript, Dialogue, Remarks, Saying, Quotes, Words And Text.

On LYBIO.net Transcripts, Speeches, Text, Words, Quotes and New Reading Content. http://www.lybio.net


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