Great Museums – Boston Children’s Museum

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Great Museums – Boston Children’s Museum

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[Great Museums – Boston Children’s Museum]

[Commentator]
America is a land of great museums and every museum has spell binding stories to tell.

[Commentator]
Are mission really lies outside our walls

[Commentator]
We help children understand the world in which they live.

[Commentator]
Kids are living in a pretty wild world.

[Commentator]
The Boston Children’s Museum – Mind Over Matter. Next on Great Museums.

[Commentator]
This program is funded by The Yawkey Foundation. Providing opportunities in Education, Health-care, Human Services, Amateur Athletics, Conservation and The Arts.

[Commentator]
Major funding for Great Museums is provided by EUREKA Foundation

[Commentator]
Like most Museum’s the Boston Children’s Museum contains priceless objects of scientific and historical and artistic significance but there is a twist.

[Child]
Duck Catchers (playing)

[Lou Casagrande – President Great Museums]
Kids have a way of learning which is to engage the world to experience the world. You just watch them out in nature, in playgrounds and at home, they are exploring, they are tinkering. Playing is learning, its the way children learn.

[Larry Coen – KidStage]
Play is becoming a more precious commodity in childrens’ lives. So in some ways we are preserving play. Providing opportunities for everyone to get back to just the roots of play, meaning that it is social, it is open-ended, it involves materials, it involves changing the space or changing yourself,

[Lindsey Richardon – Curator of Collections]
You can combine fun with learning with creativity, with making art and participating in a play and we want all of those things to be empowering to our visitors.

[Commentator] Source: LYBIO.net
The Boston Children’s Museum founded in 1913, revolutionized the museum world in the 60’s when it pioneered hands on object based exhibit experiences for children. Today, there are nearly 300 children’s museums across America.

[Jeri Robinson – Early Childhood Program]
I just can’t imagine any child ever coming here and not leaving excited about something. Just getting excited about the world around them.

[Commentator]
Enjoyment is really the key to deep learning. And, and that’s just another way to say: “Play is Learning”.

[Text] Source: LYBIO.net
The Boston Children’s Museum – Mind Over Matter.

[Commentator]
What kids sense intuitively about the children’s museum is for them, it’s child centered. When they enter the children’s museum they know its there’s.

[Lindsey Richardson – Curator of Collections]
For many children who come to the Boston Children’s Museum, this place is their first Museum and we definitely feel a responsibility of making that experience a good one.

[Jeri Robinson – Early Childhood Program] Source: LYBIO.net
Human nature is, if you like something you’ll want more of it. So if your first time coming to a museum is something that excites you, makes you feel good, makes you have fun, its probably something you will wanna do again.

[Commentator]
At The Boston Children’s Museum, there’s plenty to get excited about. There’s art. There’s culture. And a wondrous world of science.

[Lou Casagrande – President Great Museums]
Year ago we came up with this idea of using, bubbles and golf balls down ramps and Loop de Loops, just to let kids play around with phenomenon, gravity, you know, motion, Newtons’ Laws of Motion, kids need to discover in their own way the kind of cause and effect that is really behind physics.

[Commentator]
Phenomena like, what goes up, must come down.

[Alissa Daniels – Science Programs] Source: LYBIO.net
All of our science is really about getting kids to think like scientists, things like predicting, making observations, comparing, its about going in there and saying: “Hah, that bubble popped, when I touched it, but it didn’t pop when my little brother touched it. What’s he doing, that I’m not doing?”

[Lou Casagrande – President Great Museums]
Science is just understanding the phenomenon in the world and bubbles is probably the most probably the perfect way to understand spheres, optics, the way light bounces off water, creates rainbows.

[Alissa Daniels – Science Programs] Source: LYBIO.net
Kids are natural scientists, always asking questions and always just trying stuff.

[Alissa Daniels – Science Programs – Speaking To a Child]
Hold it up, so you got that little bubble there.

[Alissa Daniels – Science Programs] Source: LYBIO.net
Science is fun and its active.

[Commentator]
And its alive.

[Alissa Daniels – Science Programs]
Here in the Museum we have Turtles for introducing kids to living things. Getting a good look at an animal they may have never seen.

[Mother]
You see having cave

[Child]
No

[Mother] Source: LYBIO.net
No

[Mother]
What do you thing Turtles eat? What do you thing Turtles eat?

[Child]
Sticks

[Mother]
Sticks. I think they maybe eat some bugs.

[Alissa Daniels – Science Programs]
You can lie underneath the Turtle Tank and look at the Turtle’s belly. Ah, that’s not, that’s not what I thought it would look like or he’s even got a shell underneath, that’s interesting.

[Background Voice]
The Boston Children’s Museum was actually founded by Boston Science school teachers.

[Commentator]
In 1913, in a beautiful Victoria House in the Jamaica Plane neighborhood, the teacher built exhibit boxes and filled them with castaway natural history collections from adult museums.

[Lindsey Richardson – Curator of Collections]
They wanted to put real objects in the real world in front of kids in a way that classrooms didn’t necessarily have the resources to offer.

[Commentator]
Museum goers can study rocks and shells and marvel at the masters of flight.

[Lindsey Richardson – Curator of Collections]
We are actually, at this moment, in the middle of rediscovering our Natural History Collections, they were a major part of what the museum was about when it was founded. This is a great example of a Predator Bird, it has a sharp hooked beak and it has a particular diet because of that, that beak shaped.

[Commentator]
As the museum grew in size, so did its collections.

[John Harrington – Friend of the Museum]
As a pre-teen back in the 40’s, we frequented the museum on a weekly basis. You’d walk into the childrens museum and there would be a huge elephant standing there in the lobby.

[Jeri Robinson – Early Childhood Program]
I became involved with the museum very young. They used to have something called “July-Gonters” which took us all out around Jamaica Plain looking for birds and finding birds nests and identifying plants.

[John Harrington – Friend of the Museum]
Several times a week we would pack our little brown bag with a sandwich and hop the bus at the Childrens Museum to go off to learn how to clam or to learn the history of Boston Harbor.

[Commentator]
Boston Harbor changes quite a bit since the 1940’s. Any city child knows what a construction zone looks like. Inside the museum, they get to experience one.

[Teacher]
Have you ever used a screwdriver before?

[Commentator]
Over at Johnny’s Work Bench, kids take part to reassemble old, broken computers, telephones, VCR’s anything that isn’t dangerous to see how things work.

[Teacher]
We do the occasional [inaudible] stricken parent, going, oh, my god, she’s gonna go home and take apart the television.

[Teacher]
So you line up the star with this

[Commentator]
Lefty Loosey, Righty Tighty

[Lou Casagrande – President Great Museums]
The pure joy to learning how to manipulate a tool and and successfully screwing something in or doing a bolt, that sense of mastering

[Teacher]
You did it!

[Teacher]
The real world uses tools and there are people out there who use tools and real jobs who use tools. So its really something that kids should experience.

[Lou Casagrande – President Great Museums]
My sort of personal favorite activity in the museum world is exhibit making. Like any good product development company, we prototype.

[Gail Ringel – Exhibit Production]
That’s a really fun thing to thing about, that every shape and every color, every material that gets chosen was thought about by somebody.

[Commentator]
This prototype for an exhibit called “Get In Touch” is designed to help children see things without looking.

[Gail Ringel – Exhibit Production]
So when your on one side of it, there are a bunch of objects hidden inside and you can reach in and feel, you know, it might be a sneaker in there, or it might be a rock, but you can’t see it, and you are going to describe to somebody what it is. But then you can come on the other side and open the little window here, when your done, and was I right, was it really a sneaker?

[Commentator]
We take great pride thinking through the concepts and the stories we want to tell and how to create the hands on activities to communicate that story and then how to build it, so its beautiful and durable.

[Gail Ringel – Exhibit Production]
The museum on any given day, when you walk into it, its’ not just an institution its a process. Its’, its a work in progress.

[Text]
Growing Up

[Jeri Robinson – Early Childhood Program]
I get excited when I see the parents with their strollers and two and three year olds on there way here, because I just know that they are ready for new learning.

[Commentator]
The field of early childhood education came of age in the late 60’s. The Boston Children’s Museum responded with the prototype for play space an activity area for kids three and younger.

[Jeri Robinson – Early Childhood Program]
What we tried to do here is to provide examples of the very different types of play that children engage in, dramatic play, physical play, playing with manipulates, playing with art, this space is for both the parent and the child so that their learning and doing this together, the parent is witnessing how their child is in the world and beginning to see that child merge into a little person.
Source: LYBIO.net

[Michael Spock – Former Director 1962 – 1985]
Kids are learning machines, they will make the experience into something that they can incorporate and use for other things later on. That play is very focused, its the way they learn to function in the world.

[Commentator]
In 1962 in the age of 28, Michael Spock became the Director of the Boston Children’s Museum for the next 23 years.

[Lou Casagrande – President Great Museums]
Mike Spock again began to base the whole museum of the idea of kids touching stuff, kids doing hands-on learning.

[Commentator]
He transformed the Boston Children’s Museum into an interactive, very experimental vibrant community space of activity and speer headed a revolution in the Museum world.

[Michael Spock – Former Director 1962 – 1985]
What we were doing was unconventional but the idea that this would become a model for other places, I think was not in out heads.

[Commentator]
Down came down many of the glass cases. And up went exhibits like this one.

[Michael Spock – Former Director 1962 – 1985]
An exhibit we called: “What’s inside.” And it had all kinds of nifty things. There was a cross section of a city street with all the workings buried underneath and you could climb down into a man hole.

[Commentator]
There were also controversial exhibits like: “Death and Loss” and “What if you couldn’t…?”

[Jeri Robinson – Early Childhood Program]
Here you could come and sit in a wheelchair or what it might be like to be blind and walk through a course and use your other senses, but kids wanted to talk about those things.

[Commentator]
In 1979, Spock made a big move relocated the Museum to the downtown waterfront.

[Michael Spock – Former Director 1962 – 1985]
On the opening day, kids burst through the doors and where everywhere running around. And they would zero in on something that was intriguing and by zeroing in they would settle into an activity in that space and be completely absorbed and hang on much longer than you would expect.

[Commentator]
The museum became an anchor of a major downtown revitalization project and it became more accessible to a wider range of residence.

[Lou Casagrande – President Great Museums]
We are a convening place, we are a gathering place, we’re a safe place, we’re a neutral place, we are all children, we are all families can find each other. Source: LYBIO.net

[Lindsey Richardson – Curator of Collections]
There are Childrens’ Museums everywhere. And people expect when you go to a Childrens Museum you have practically limitless hands on activities, but as one of the oldest Museums we have a collection that makes us a bit unusual. We have 50 thousand objects in our collections. People react to objects, emotionally, they react intellectually, they react imaginatively.

[Commentator]
Precious cultural objects from the museums significant collection, are woven into the displays throughout the entire museum. Even in the interactive areas. Children get to touch these special objects with there minds but not their hands.

[Lindsey Richardson – Curator of Collections]
Grandparents Attic is one of the oldest exhibits in the childrens museum and it is a history exhibit. It lets kids have hand-on activities surrounded by real objects. So they can play dress-ups and they can also look at what people wore in their times. They can practice buttons, they can practice zips, they can look at old paper dolls, they can look at an old suitcase, or an old photograph.

[Jeri Robinson – Early Childhood Program]
Somebody always walks in there and goes: “Oh, I remember that, we had one of those.” Or your grandmother has one of those, or that was in our kitchen so it illicits all those stories and that sharing across generations. Source: LYBIO.net Real objects is what we see in our lives and everyday. The, the objects in our collections may reflect 20, 50, 100 years ago, of people from all over the world. They come together to tell very powerful stories.

[Commentator]
This Bisk Doll survived the Great Boston Fire of 1872.

[Lindsey Richardson – Curator of Collections]
It was an enormous fire, it goes down in history of one of the biggest losses to property in American Fire History. And the tag on the doll actually tells us, who rescued her. (Rescued At Boston Fire Nov 18th) It was rescued at the Boston Fire November 18th 1872. You turn it(tag) over. It was by Captain R. Walsh while on duty there.

[Commentator]
The musem has nearly 5,000 dolls in its collection. Ranging in American Conchita dolls to Barbie Dolls to Folk dolls.

[Lindsey Richardson – Curator of Collections]
What I like about the Folk Dolls is that they are 3D representations of, like a little snap shot of culture.

[Lindsey Richardson – Curator of Collections]
Folk dolls are from around the world dressed to represent a particular place and particular time. And these dolls were made in Russia in the 1930’s and 40’s. And this one is a bride doll. And she is very interesting to children because she doesn’t look like most of the brides they are familiar with. She is not wearing a fancy white dress, she’s wearing plaid, her hair is decorated with flowers and ribbons, so she is a good example of what you can learn from looking at a Folk Doll.

[Lindsey Richardson – Curator of Collections]
This is a Canadian soldier doll. One of a series of French Dolls made in 1918 during the Bombardment of Paris. Source: LYBIO.net You can almost imagine the doll artist, blocking out the noise, which you can’t avoid in any way by working so hard to make the details correct, from his boots to his pants, the different pockets with the little buttons, all the different compartments for carrying things.

[Commentator]
Some of the museums most popular dolls and all houses are on display in The Hall Of Toys. Here visitors can peek into the dramatic world of the Deva Doll. Or imagine the hustle and bustle of Boston’s Smallest Flea Market.

[Lindsey Richardson – Curator of Collections]
There’s a Woodchuck and he has a table, where he’s selling stuffed people to a duck. There’s a man selling books, there’s a little truck, with a little pig ornament.

[Jeri Robinson – Early Childhood Program]
I think for kids today, they need that bit of fantasy that sort of, to get into that little tiny world. Kids are living in a pretty wild world.

[Commentator]
This quarky sculpture introduces kids to the wild wild world of the Great Unkle Herbert, who started his wood carving fantasia in the lat 1800’s.

[Lindsey Richardson – Curator of Collections]
We ask the kids what he might of done to make everything so shiny, and my favorite answer was hair-spray. Its’ okay to ask questions and not have answers, its okay to imagine the answers, if you don’t have them, that’s how you make discoveries. And that’s what we are about, we want to encourage our visitors to take risks to take imaginative leaps.

[The Art of Life]

[Lou Casagrande – President Great Museums]
If you ask kindergartens, who wants to be an artist, you know, most of the hands will go up. By fifth grade you’ll be lucky to get one or two hands go up. Source: LYBIO.net Kids, kids get turned off to the fact that art is natural, and, and, and, a powerful way of expressing your ideas. So what we are trying to do in the Art Studio, is get families to see that activity is fun, and engaging and something they all can participate in.

[Bridge Matros – Art Program]
The art studio experience is really for kids and grown ups too. So, if your in the art studio and at the table you probably have a paint brush or a marker lay in your hands. Getting messy. The parents might start to interfere at which that point, I give them a paint brush. And we say, mom, or dad, do your own. The parents end up having their own experience that is separate from the kids, as well as kind of learning about their kids by just watching what they are doing, so ideally its a really kind of special moment between parent and kid.

[On Stage]
Announcements
Announcements
Before we start the show

[Lou Casagrande – President Great Museums]
We really think Childrens’s Museums are Theaters in every sense. And have a special theater, a real theater presidium stage, just adds that theatrical power to the whole museum visit.

[Teacher]
I’m looking for someone to come on up stage and wear this hat and play the part of Peter Pig.

[Larry Coen – KidStage]
I get concerned about the DVD generation, I get concerned about the level of control and the lack of surprise, ah, one of the things I like about theater is that its’ different every-time. Source: LYBIO.net A lot of what we are doing on Kids Stage is about preparation for school, sitting quietly and listening, working on your attention span, following a narrative, people are amazed that children as young as the kids here, some of them as young as 2 years old, get up and are fine facing a hundred and 40 sets of eyes in the audience.

[Lou Casagrande – President Great Museums]
Being in those lights, you know, performing with a costume on, in front of your parents or relatives, or your, or your, brother or sister, ah, is really exciting for these kids,

[Larry Coen – KidStage]
That’s where a lot of the drama comes from is the kids on the stage. How will this wolf behave, how with this Peter Pig behave? Why did you want to be Pasty Pig? Well, she has the brick house so I knew I wouldn’t get blow down.

[Teacher]
And the little pigs inside shook like jelly with fear. Source: LYBIO.net

[Larry Coen – KidStage]
It always astonishes me that the youngest, tiniest child is a fully developed, fully functioning, autonomous, human being capable of making choices on the stage.

[Text On Blackboard]
Write about … is important.. BE CREATIVE!

[Larry Coen – KidStage]
I’m amazed by that, amazed by how individual kids can be.

[Teacher and Children]
Happily ever after. (applauding)

[Teacher and Children]
Yeah

[Text]
Keeping it real

[Native American drum circle]
(Aboriginal hand drum)

[Children]
(jumping)
Aah ya
Aah ya
Aah ya

[Annawon Weedon – Native Programs]
I think you got it

[Annawon Weedon – Native Programs]
I think you got it

[Lou Casagrande – President Great Museums]
Respecting others is a primary value of the Boston Children’s Museum. Especially, in the world we live in.

[Annawon Weedon – Native Programs]
We try not to focus on just the historical way of life, that’s why the name of the exhibit “We’re Still Here”, because thirty years ago when this exhibit was created, people didn’t understand that Native people still existed, and that we live in Modern lifestyles. Source: LYBIO.net

[Commentator]
In modern houses, in modern kitchens.

[Annawon Weedon – Native Programs]
And even in a 2 hour program, which I always do in Modern clothes, so the kids will understand I’m a person who’s walking the streets dressed just like you are today. They understand that, but when I wrap up by showing them my poster of me in my tribal clothes they automatically think I’m 500 years old, again. So, its an ongoing challenge. We are modern, living, breathing people.

[Lou Casagrande – President Great Museums]
Annawon is is a great story teller, he makes that world real for them, and that’s what we need to do in many different ways for many different cultures.

[Lindsey Richardson – Curator of Collections] Source: LYBIO.net
We have cultural artifacts from all over the world. Miss Kyōto is an ambassador doll from Japan. They sent 58 dolls to the States in 1927 and the dolls went on a tour of America in the 20’s and then each sent to their home. And we have Miss Kyōto, and she is meant to represent a 6 years old school girl from Japan in the 20’s.

[Akemi Chayama – Japan Programs]
The museum has been introducing Japanese Culture quite some time since its beginning of the Museum’s history. Source: LYBIO.net

[Commentator]
In 1979, Japan sent the Boston Children’s Museum an entire house.

[Akemi Chayama – Japan Programs]
Boston and Kyōto were celebrating their 20th Anniversary of a sister city relationship and that’s how the house came over here. So the rest of the Museum, they might be running around, jumping around, and ah, with a lot of colors, and simulations, but when they come over here, they feel a little bit different. Wow, this is cool. That’s the first step – reaction. They take off their shoes and they can walk around the house and they can slip into the fouton bed, or sit at a Japanese traditional table. So sometimes the kids actually even take an afternoon nap, and go home.

[Children]
Yeahhh…..

[Commentator]
Home to an increasingly multicultural (Boston Black – A City Connects) Boston. Source: LYBIO.net

[Jeri Robinson – Early Childhood Program]
Boston, black community is a very diverse community, it to say to everyone just because a group of people may look alike does not mean at all they are very much alike, they have many different experiences.

[Lou Casagrande – President Great Museums]
In the Boston Black exhibit there is a ?comaño?, which is a Dominican sorta store.

[Woman In The Pico Duande Market]
And I’ll get a Mango.

[Lou Casagrande – President Great Museums]
That give parents the perfect opportunity to talk about cultural differences in a very natural way.

[Woman In The Pico Duande Market]
Yesterday, you want more mangoes?

[Jeri Robinson – Early Childhood Program] Source: LYBIO.net
They get a chance to find out items that they haven’t seen before necessarily, coconuts in their husk, coconuts in the raw, that type of examples of things, there is maps in there to share a little bit about where these countries are, but then, even time clocks, to talk about the different time zones.

[Megan Dickerson – Community Programs]
Boston Children’s Museum is a common ground for a changing Boston. Many adults are reluctant to talk about race and identity with their young children, but here in a simulated neighborhood environment they can practice and hopefully that practice will carry on to their own neighborhoods. And so, if we can get kids talking, and if we can get parents talking, then we made a difference even in a small way, here in Boston.

[Commentator]
Boston Children’s Museum is definitely making a difference in the community, helping kids make the grade through programs like: “Countdown To Kindergarten”.

[Lou Casagrande – President Great Museums]
Every summer,late August, we invite all the in-coming Kindergartners to bring their parents down to the Museum for a big celebration of, fact that they are going to Kindergarten, and they arrive wearing these special yellow shirts that say: “I’m going to kindergarten.” Pulling their parents, we have a school bus there, so kids can practice getting on a school bus, we have the Boston Public Library, so kids can sign up for library cards, its a fair and festival, that’s realy part of a whole year of activities to acquaint the kids, really as much, their parents with the notion of entering school.

[Commentator]
The museum is not just for students, its also for teachers. The leadership center provides workshops as well as teaching kids, packed with activities and supplies, videos, photos, models, and objects from the museums’ collection.

[Lou Casagrande – President Great Museums]
Our mission really lies outside our walls. If if children aren’t successful in greater Boston, it doesn’t matter what happens inside the Boston Children’s Museum.

[Commentator]
From revolutionizing the Children’s Museum experience, to inspiring a love of learning in each and every child that walks through its doors, the Boston Children’s Museum is changing the world one child at a time.

[Lou Casagrande – President Great Museums] Source: LYBIO.net
That we’ve made Boston a better place for children and families, have we made it a greater place to grow up in, that’s what we want.

[Commentator]
Learn more about America’s Great Museums, at Great Museums dot org.

[Commentator]
The great museums collection is available on DVD. Call 1-800-230-4453 or visit Great Museums dot org.

[Commentator]
Museums hold the treasures and tell the tails that make America great.

[Commentator]
This program is funded by The Yawkey Foundation. Providing opportunities in Education, Health-care, Human Services, Amateur Athletics, Conservation and The Arts.

[Commentator]
Major funding for Great Museums is provided by EUREKA Foundation, explore America’s great museums.

Great Museums – Boston Children’s Museum. The Boston Children’s Museum founded in 1913, revolutionized the museum world in the 60’s when it pioneered hands on object based exhibit experiences for children. Today, there are nearly 300 children’s museums across America. For many children who come to the Boston Children’s Museum, this place is their first Museum and we definitely feel a responsibility of making that experience a good one. Complete Full Script, Dialogue, Remarks, Saying, Quotes, Words And Text By Great Museums – Boston Children’s Museum.

On LYBIO.net Transcripts, Speeches, Text, Words, Quotes and New Reading Content. http://www.lybio.net


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Comments on Great Museums – Boston Children’s Museum Leave a Comment

December 26, 2010

webox @ 4:22 am #

I’m so grateful that you already have transcribed the biggest part of the video! I’ll be really happy if it is completed. Promise to be patient while expecting :)

LYBIO.net Please see above all complete.

webox @ 11:51 am #

You are pretty nice people doing a great and very useful job. Thank you so much!
Btw it was quite easy to be patient, it wasn’t for so long :)

LYBIO.net We are a community for online video-text accuracy.

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